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, reduce the deficit, and begin to show leadership in various areas of new technology that demonstrated here to the rest of the world. kohl will always be there. -- coal is always going to be there. there's lots of work there. all the sales will help, i think, of leverage our capability and give us more options. >> let me bring you in. 92% of american transportation is run on petroleum. with this new landscape for energy production of, how are we doing on diversifying different kinds of things that are running our transportation? >> so far, it is going slow. something that was deeply focused on was something note senator alexander said earlier. we need to find more and use less. i think you're asking about the use less part. the extension of the changing fuel efficiency standards was one thing, but we believe fervently in the need to diversify away from using petroleum for transportation and given that it represents 70% of our use of petroleum to begin with. with the change in technology and the access to so much homegrown natural gas, we can use that and we can also use the development
in national efficiency that has been brought about by technology and the new fuel efficiency standards that were enacted by the bush administration and were increased by the obama administration. the report is not political in any way shape or form. it endorses things that are supported by the right in some cases and that are supported by people on the left. you cannot just take the parts that you like. you have to take the holistic approach, to maximize u.s. production and to reduce consumption partly by diversifying our transportation sector away from petroleum. the last thing i will say is that petroleum use in transportation is the pivot point of this entire problem. 70% of our use of petroleum in this country is for transportation. transportation is fueled about 93% of the time by petroleum. if you want to reduce the united states' dependence on imported petroleum and the related geopolitical issues, particularly in an issue when rising demand is creating a potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum o
society had generated technology and political networks that seemed to have conquered the globe. at this point, it was not only possible to go around the world. it had become a poplar past time. representation of doing a circumnavigation became playful, entizing -- enticing even joy us. there were costs. not all of them hidden. there seemed to be hidden glories making an swing around the planet. over the 20th century and now to the 21st century. the confidence has given way to doubt. technology logically now reforms of travel especially airplane and rocket propelled safe travel -- safe 19th century. equally, it's now clear that imperialism ha smoothed way for early under political and social conditions that would be unwise and unjust. above all, there's a growing sense of the planet as again beginning to bite back or slug us off. now that the environmental cost have begun to hunt us. we live with all three legacies of around the world travel. a reemerging fear that the planet could slug us off. continuing confident we might be able to generate technologies and political alliance
efficiency that's been brought about by technology and the new fuel efficiency standards that were enacted by the bush administration first, and then, of course, were increased by the obama administration. it's important to recognize that the eslc report is not political in any way, shape or form. it endorses things that are heartily supported by the right , in some cases, and on the other hand that are supported by people on the left. it's important to recognize you can't just take the parts that you like. you have to take the wholistic approach, which is to, again, maximize u.s. production and to at the same time significantly reduce consumption partly by diversifying our transportation sector away from petroleum. now, the last thing i'll say before we sit down is it's important to recognize that petroleum use in transportation is the pivot point of this entire problem. about 70% of our 18.7 million barrel per day use of petroleum in this country is for transportation, and transportation is fueled about 93% of the time by petroleum. so if you want to reduce the united states' dependence
. blame apple and overall technology having a tough day. down 13 points right now on the nasdaq at 2982. the s&p is holding with a gain of about five points. we'll have more on the markets in a moment. first, let's get to what's going on in washington. more republicans breaking ranks to join what we hope will be a bipartisan call for higher tax rates and entitlement cuts. eamon javers on capitol hill has the very latest details for us. eamon. >> reporter: hi, bill. that letter does call for the speaker to negotiate, including all options on the table. it is a bipartisan letter. we should be a little bit careful on this because the letter habit actually been sent yet, we're told by congressman mike simpson's office. he's the congressman circulating the letter. he's gathering signatures from other members of congress, as we speak. they expect to send this letter. i've talked to some conservative republicans today here on capitol hill who say their minds are not changed, and that's going to be the group that's most difficult for the speaker to negotiate. nonetheless, the fact there's such
challenges that we are facing on technological advances. that has created a situation where the engine of sustainable economic growth and center of the middle -- the good a middle- class jobs are not as plentiful as they once were. finding a way to get them back or at least find a new way to create the middle class jobs that are sustainable as a court challenge that we face as a country. i also want to say that, we should not get stuck -- in my view should not get stuck thinking we have to solve the whole problem right away. t -- 2% growth makes everything look worse. if you were to create the aggregate demand that would give confidence to small businesses to invest again and again construction and housing going, would get the people coming into the workforce and we would start to see reasonable growth, the challenges seem a lot more solvable. i think we often get lost a in the hard challenges of our long- term future economic growth when some of the short-term challenges are not that complicated. if we were to make the infrastructure investments that we need, if we were to do the kind
. get your kicks from that analyst meeting. and united technologies. cvs is the cheapest and best drugstore play p i would be willing to buying ahead of the meeting, particularly if you have a little fiscal cliff panic before thursday. which person's going to come on wednesday and create the buying opportunity for cvs? phillips 66 reminds uz house smart it was to break up the old conoco phillips and perhaps put some focus on how hess could be next. united technologies will give us aw fiscal cliff update and a sense of how aerospace is doing now that goodrich, a premium supplier to 'o'space, is part of the family. on friday scotts miracle grow. endless excuse making for missed quarters. can they explain the poor execution? i'll listen, but frankly i doubt it. also on friday we get november industrial production and capacity utilization numbers. did november really matter or was it all sandy? i think prices were stagnant. but i want to try to figure out whether the new boom in cars and homes could impact industrial production and capacity utilization no matter what. i'm trying to un
that technology has created more advanced ought mated factories and that has resulted in fewer jobs necessary to build products. there is no question about that and that is a negative in terms of job creation. but it's also positive in that we have seen a little bit of a trend, and we saw apple this week announce they were going to make one of their products in the united states. it was related to the economics underliing this. if you need fewer people to make the stuff, then the cost difficult rerble to make it here versus there i did minute shs then the argument is we can make it. number two there is a national advisory counsel and one of the areas of focus has been in additive manufacturing which is really an interesting area. over the next decade it has the potential to have much more personal liesed approach, more custo approaches to manufacturing that could result in more things being made here as opposed to being made other places. so it is a concern but people are more optimistic now than five years ago because some of this technology advancing actually is starting to be in some secto
-packard or steve jobs. the seats we plant brings the vast forests of new products and new technologies and new patents in the future. that is where we have to -- we have to keep our eye on the main thought here. that is the discipline, the imagination, and the investment. that is what makes california -- that is why people are still coming here. they're not staying in colorado, i am sorry to say. they're right here. [applause] >> just briefly, setting aside plunder for a moment. >> i am sorry about plunder. it is a big part of wealth creation. >> could you talk briefly about your turn initiative? >> it is going well. mike rossi is leading the charge. i have met with what i think will be the next president of china. we have delegations from china to come here. we're sending delegations there. this is not just business as usual. we're getting detailed committees and proposals, a couple of the key states. we want good coming this way. we want good going out way. -- goods coming this way and we want goods going out that way. >> are you doing anything like that? >> we have been working on the north
of technology. but what we are seeing here in doha are many developed countries leaving the kyoto protocol, and joining the united states, who had left some time ago, and the remaining members in the kyoto protocol are putting forward emission reduction figures that are too low -- something like 20% for europe, which they have already achieved. so the system we started with in bali, five years ago, that developed countries would cut emissions by 5% to 20%, a similar effort under the convention. >> the u.s. did not sign onto the kyoto protocol? >> under bush, they agreed they would do similar to would be to recall program -- joke part of all members would do -- tkyoto protocol but never signed on. now each country puts forward whenever it can do, and that will not be challenged. this is not based on science. as a result we have very low emissions coming from developed countries, which means they are showing a bad example to developing countries who would want to do more, but seeing that leaders are not living up to their expectations, this has repressed their ability to do more in terms of
been brought about by technology and the new fuel efficiency standards that were enacted by the bush administration and were increased by the obama administration. the report is not political in any way shape or form. it endorses things that are supported by the right in some cases and that are supported by people on the left. you cannot just take the parts that you like. you have to take the holistic approach, to maximize u.s. production and to reduce consumption partly by diversifying our transportation sector away from petroleum. the last thing i will say is that petroleum use in transportation is the pivot point of this entire problem. 70% of our use of petroleum in this country is for transportation. transportation is fueled about 93% of the time by petroleum. if you want to reduce the united states' dependence on imported petroleum and the related geopolitical issues, particularly in an issue when rising demand is creating a potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum or the prices are set on the wo
this missile? i have progressively gained better technology over time and progressively gained back during number of methods over a number of years and decades. .. the announcement of radar for the ally. do you have an update on that program and other efforts underway or envisioned to increase broadly missile defense, our pasture there, and that of our allies and partners. >> well, yes, i have nothing further to add they are can wanted to discuss that with our allies to determine the times and location so i have nothing more than that. when it comes to missile ballistic defense, there's a problem that affects our partners, allies in the region, as well as the homeland in that we'll continue to wait for opportunity to be able to strengthen our partnerships and our capabilities with our allies to be able to deal with the threats as they e emerge. we're going that today. >> intercepters, anything else? >> at this point in time, i'm not prepared to talk about any of the details of that. i would just say that we continue to look for opportunities to improve our capabilities as the threat set ch
that they have the capacity to be able to build and have the missile technology to be able to use it in ways of their choosing down the road. and this, as i said earlier, would be very destabilizing, i think, to not only the region, but to the international security environment. who's helping them in my assessment of their ability to be able to launch this missile? i think that they have progressively gained better technology over time, and they have progressively gained that through a number of methods over a number of years and decades. to the degree that they will be more successful than they were last time in such a short period of time and how that -- what they've done to correct it, i can't tell you how they assess that. we'll just have to -- should they choose to go ahead with it, we'll just have to see how it goes. >> -- moving into the region to monitor this? >> well, i won't go into the specifics of how we or our allies position ourselves to insure that we understand what's happening, but we do watch this very carefully, watch it very closely. of course, in my role as the pa-com co
've always been at the forefront of anything that could help us from the technology world. we got the database together back in the early '80s and were one of the first to go on to a computer system. so once you got -- that was, we wrapped our mind around that project, then we were able to make the store more profitable. but over the years, um, most recently is that in order to diversify we started our own digital book-on-demand business called the troy bookmakers where we make books. we literally physically make books. we, um, we take the manuscript, we format it into a book, we print the pages, we dip it in glue, we trim it up, slap a cover on it, and we make beautiful books. for our local authors that want to self-publish and also for some of the, you know, for some of the professors that want to do textbooks, for people that want to do family cookbook, you name it. but we've stayed right at the cutting edge of digital printing technology. and the other avenue that we've gone down to to stay on top of things is we started our own publishing company called staff picks press. and
and russia. it's believed they discussed ways to cancel the launch. the ships have technology to track missiles. they're also considering raising the country's alert status by one notch. >>> euro zone finance ministers approved a loan just last week. now the greeks have announced one way they will use the funds. what's the latest? >> one of the requirements for greek receiving the bailout fund is they cut down their debt. they will buy back government bonds a t a discount. greek officials said on monday they will purchase the bonds from private financial institutions. they will pay 30 to 40% of the original price before the bonds mature. the announcement came a week after euro zone finance ministers agreed to offer 43.7 billion euros. that's about $57 billion. greek officials said the critor institutions will receive bonds issued by the euro zone's bail out fund instead of cash. the buy back program is a condition leaders must fulfill to receive the next cash infusion. the success depends on the bond holders. finance chiefs met in brussels to discuss how to proceed with extending eight
. jekyll technology parts. >> science, technology, engineering and math are fundamental to the growth of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanism
, the old cassette tape idea to using the latest in digital technology. we are excited about the transition because it makes it faster, cheaper, and more efficient to get good quality reading materials to people when they need it. the service is obviously designed for the government to be sure that people have equitable access to the materials. in the spirit of public libraries in this country, we have more public libraries than mcdonald's, we have a chance with a service like this to be sure everybody has a chance to be well informed citizens, which is obviously the most critical and being able to enjoy the rewards of a great novel and literature and being a part of the world a run them. host: our next segment deals with the jobless rate. joining us is rick newman. the numbers said 7.7% when it comes to the unemployment rate. can you tell us what leads to that number? guest: there are some people getting jobs, but as you mentioned a couple of minutes ago, i think the bigger factor is the labor force actually shrunk in november. fewer people were working or looking for work. the unemploymen
is that they were affiliated with groups affiliated with al qaeda, like they were getting the technology and the weapons and a new type of explosive that wreaks havoc. and results in the maximum damage in terms of loss of life and in terms of destruction. by the way, i just want to say, it was a very active description. attack the shopping malls, distract the police forces and then try to target hotels and cafes where jordanians and others are enjoying their daily lives. but also to attack the entire neighborhood of the u.s. embassy, not just the u.s. embassy, lots of jordanians live in the vicinity of the embassy, with mortar shells and sophisticated weaponry. >> a lot of americans in amman at any time, but especially at the u.s. embassy in amman, a major u.s. embassy. >> and lots of jordanians. >> have you had serious conversations with your iraqi counterparts about dealing with this al qaeda growth in their country? >> of course. our intelligence sources -- you have confidence in nuri al maliki, the prime minister of iraq, that he's doing what he's done? >> he's not my responsibility
graphics, icons, a mouse, and the point-and-click technology that is still standard. it was innovative and influential, but sales were disappointing, and jobs' confrontational management style became even more brittle. he would try and rationalize it in this taped interview with isaacson. >> i feel totally comfortable going in front of everybody else, you know, "god, we really [bleep] up the engineering on this, didn't we?" that's the ante for being in the room. so we're brutally honest with each other, and all of them can tell me they think i'm full of [bleep], and i can tell anyone i think they're full of [bleep], and we've had some rip-roaring arguments where we're yelling at each other. >> jobs loved the arguments but not everybody else did, and isaacson writes that some of his top people began defecting. >> he was not the world's greatest manager. in fact, he could have been one of the world's worst managers. you know, he was always, you know, upending things and, you know, and throwing things into turmoil. this made great products, but it didn't make for a great management style.
in three directions with up to 50% more brush movements than leading sonic technology. oral-b power brushes. go to for the latest offers. oral-b power brushes. why they have a raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one can. that's why ally has a raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. with scottrader streaming quotes, any way you want. fully customize it for your trading process -- from thought to trade, on every screen. and all in real time. which makes it just like having your own trading floor, right at your fingertips. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. try our easy-to-use scottrader streaming quotes. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> well dumb to you. >> great to be here. >> nice to finally meet you. human rights issues are exploding all over the world. regardless of anything else. it is a huge human
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it will actually create jobs, will bring in technology, will create infrastructure in the supply chain so currently a debate of we are expecting the lower parts of parliament to take a vote on this matter about 7:00 p.m. india time. it seems like it will go through the low herb house, but the big question mark is on the upper house of parliament and that is where the arithmetic doesn't seem to be working in favor of government. foreign investors are going to be watching this very closely because if this is turned back, if there is a u-turn on this poll circumstance it means that walmart cannot open shop here in india. for now, it's back to you. >> thanks for that. that's the latest. we'll see what happens. >>> now over to japan, where election timing may spell budget delays. we have the story from tokyo. >> the election campaign has officially kicked off in japan, but there are worries the budget is not likely to be ready pi the end of this year. they will likely call a special session to elect a new prime minister, then select a cabinet before moving on to budget matters. once they reconvene in ja
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: house republicans today offered their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is necessary without raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add up. >> ifill: the white house proposes raising $1.6 trillion in taxes over ten years, imposin
much every place. >> we haven't got the technology. >> and you expect that? >> absolutely, so the point is stop putting up inefficient solar panels now. but make sure you get them to be cheap enough everyone will want them in decades. >> your judge is that a carbon tax may reduce co 2 emissions a little tiny put if you do it in america, but won't help the overall problem. now i want you to tell me, do you think that a carbon tax is coming to america? >> well, there's certainly a lot of good arguments why you'd want one. it brings in a the lot of money, but the real problem of course, brings in lots and lots of political controversy so you're actually taking your eye off the ball of fixing the problem in the sense that-- >> let's have your judgment. it brings with it political problems, i've got that, but brings in a lot of money so is it likely to happen? >> i think a good chance it could happen. >> of what form do you think it would take, a gas tax or an emissions tax of some sort? >> i don't know, and again, economists would say if you're going to have one at least it should be broad
was to step out of the story for a moment and just look at technology, look at what's coming out from user-generated images, from voices of syrians trying to tell their stories and just collect it in one place, so we decided to build syria deeply. it's part news aggregator, part backgrounder and part original reporting. what we felt we needed do was to give people more background, more indication and engagement on these issues because months and months into this crisis, so many people just don't understand and don't really have a way to make sense of it. it's so complex and there are so many sophisticated pieces, we wanted to do the best we could with technology to make it all make sense. >> and how tough is it to actually get an accurate picture of what is taking place on the ground? we have heard that we know with the internet being down, some of the phone lines as well, that it is very difficult to actually have people communicate with each other and really get the real story out. >> absolutely. we had a kind of lucky break last week. our reporters in aleppo were on the internet using a
and developers also outperformed. elsewhere south korean automakers and technology majors lent support to the kospi ending higher by 0.4%. in australia, banks rose on expectations of a rate cut. defensive stocks also helped push the asx 200 higher by 0.6%. sensex lost 0.2% today. back to you. >> thanks for that. have a good evening there. meanwhile in china, mainland's factories are printing out more goods. eunice has the details in this report from beijing. >> chinese factories appear to be recovering. the hsbc pmi and the government's official pmi both show a steady improvement for the industry in november. the hsbc pmi final reading came in at 50.5, that's the quickest expansion in over a year. the industry saw a pick up in new orders as well as stronger exports thanks in part to christmas demand. the concern is though about the unevenness of the recovery. the sub indices for employment as well as for small and medium sized companies ticked downwards and that suggested to some that the recovery is mainly led by investment and state owned enterprises. a bigger worry is about the outl
, firing it into your or israel, and ultimately getting a icbm technology, being able to reach the united states? this is a classic paradigm. wmd terrorism. what are the real risks of wmd terrorism and throw their significant risks. -- terrorism? >> there are significant risks. when you look at chemical and biological, they're also very significant threats there. when you look what happened in world war ii, the japanese army dropped infected fleas in china and killed 50,000 people as a biotech. played infected fleas killed 50,000 people -- plague-infected fleas killed 50,000 people. you have terrorist groups in the middle east. al-qaeda has tried very hard for years to develop wmd. probably the closest they came was when there were a group of retired pakistan the leaders -- pakistani leaders to try to team up with al-qaeda to help them develop a wmd. luckily they were tracked down upon before things got too far out of hand. that is an example of al qaeda. you have to worry potentially about iranian scientists teaming any similar way. you look at hezbollah, there are rumors that hezbollah
technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even conceal most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper hiding in a field or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out very similar to what they carry with a survival blanket, throw it over top on them and unless you walked into them you wouldn't know they were there. >> reporter: what was once firmly in the world of make-believe, could quickly become quite real. and the science is in the special fabric. you don't need a power source or some instruction manual to make it work. theoretically, any soldier, even in the most remote location, could quickly put it on and put it to work. chris lawrence, cnn, the pen gone. >> pretty remarkable. >> i'll say. >>> 45 minutes past the hour. a check on some of the morning's top stories ahead, including a turf war on the internet. why your photo of today's breakfast may not reach as many people. oh, the humanity of it. i'm freaked out about this. i can't wait to talk more about it. >>> watch us an
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)